Delphi Shelf Life Reaches a New Low

I am going to try to keep this post short and to the point. I don’t want to rant (too much) or say anything I regret (too much), but something has to be said.

When it comes to iOS development, Delphi XE4, a major product released by Embarcadero five months ago, is now obsolete. If you want support for iOS 7 you must buy their new product, Delphi XE5.

Let’s take a step back and look at the facts when it comes to Delphi and Embarcadero chasing the mobile landscape:

  • Delphi XE2 – released September 2011. Claims support for iOS development but, by all reports, fails to deliver. iOS development makes use of the FreePascal compiler and cannot use traditional Delphi code.
  • Delphi XE3 – released September 2012. Support for iOS development completely removed. Anyone who built their iOS app on the foundation of XE2 was left out in the cold.
  • Delphi XE4 – released April 2013. Claims support for iOS development (again). Anyone who wants the iOS development support promised in XE2 must now buy XE4, released as a new product only seven months after XE3.

And now Delphi XE5 has been released only five months after Delphi XE4. It’s another new version and another paid upgrade.

Here’s the real rub though. iOS 7 was just released by Apple. It features a new UI and new navigation elements for apps. Anyone using Xcode (the traditional tool for iOS development which is free) could simply recompile their apps and resubmit them to support iOS 7.

What about Delphi XE4 customers? The ones who just put down their hard earned money for iOS support, again, five months ago? They are left out in the cold. Again. If a Delphi XE4 customer wants to support iOS 7 they must now purchase Delphi XE5. I confirmed this myself with a back-and-forth on Twitter with Jim McKeeth from Embarcadero:

Jim goes on to point out that, if you forgo using the bundled UI kit in your iOS app, you can still leverage the new iOS 7 elements using Delphi XE4:

However, this is basically suggesting the customer not use the same UI technology that is the very heart of Embarcadero’s marketing strategy for several releases now: FireMonkey.

To be clear, I am not upset by a six month release cycle. A lot of companies do that and it’s a smart move for some of them. However, Embarcadero is releasing Delphi like a subscription while selling it like a packaged product. While they offer “Software Assurance” this is a far cry from a subscription. This is an added fee on top of your purchase that allows you to get major upgrades that happen to be released within a year. It’s insurance. It’s the type of thing most of us pass up when checking out at Best Buy.

All-in-all this has just left a horrible taste in my mouth and the mouths of many other developers. My advice? If Delphi has turned into a subscription then charge a subscription. Stop packaging it as something that will be obsolete in 5 months without another purchase.

0 thoughts on “Delphi Shelf Life Reaches a New Low

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>